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MISSION STATEMENT
Promote an understanding of neuroscience research within the educational community. We hope to achieve this goal by promoting neuroscience research that has implications for educational practice and by providing a forum for the issues and controversies connecting these two fields.

Monday, August 21, 2017
2012 Annual Meeting -

Business Meeting

Business Meeting Overview
Scheduled Time: Fri, Apr 13 - 6:15pm - 7:45pm
Building/Room: Sheraton Wall Centre, Third Level - South Pavilion Ballroom B
Title Displayed in Event Calendar: Brain, Neurosciences, and Education SIG Business Meeting
Session Organize / Chairr: Mary Layne Kalbfleisch (Krasnow Investigations of Developmental Learning and Behavior)

**Members should attend. Nonmembers and interested parties are also welcome**

Symposium

Twice Exceptionality: Insight Into Paradoxical Learners Through Neurological and Neuropsychological Investigation
Scheduled Time: Sat, Apr 14 - 2:15pm - 3:45pm
Building/Room: Sheraton Wall Centre, Third Level - South Pavilion Ballroom A
Title Displayed in Event Calendar: Twice Exceptionality: Insight Into Paradoxical Learners Through Neurological and Neuropsychological Investigation
Session Organizer/Chair: Mary Layne Kalbfleisch (Krasnow Investigations of Developmental Learning and Behavior)
Participants:

Twice-Exceptionality Post-IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) 2004
Susan G. Assouline (University of Iowa)

 

A Neurodevelopmental Study of the Gifted and Twice Exceptional With Dyslexia
Jeffrey W. Gilger (Purdue University)

 

When Extremely Gifted Students Are Twice-Exceptional: Issues and Insights Related to Diagnosis and Intervention
Linda Brody (Johns Hopkins University)

Discussant Virginia W. Berninger (University of Washington)
Abstract

How does neurodevelopment lead to both gifts and disabilities in the same individual? How do we leverage existing measures to sharpen characterization of twice exceptionality expressed in dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism? Though a topic of compelling interest for those interested in STEM talent and creativity development, because of the strengths often exhibited by twice exceptional individuals such as visual and spatial ability, pattern recognition and memory, and divergent thinking capacity, we know very little about the underlying functional and structural neurophysiology, or translating diagnosis to programmatic avenues for supporting this intellectual combination. This session will report current results from neuroimaging and neuropsychology alongside data from two of the country’s leading centers identifying and serving twice exceptional students.

**Members should attend. Nonmembers and interested parties are also welcome**

Symposium

Translating Scientific and Technological Advances From the Laboratory to the Classroom: It’s About Time
Scheduled Time: Sun, Apr 15 - 8:15am - 10:15am
Building/Room: Sheraton Wall Centre, Grand Ballroom Level - North Grand Ballroom B
Title Displayed in Event Calendar: Translating Scientific and Technological Advances From the Laboratory to the Classroom: It’s About Time
Session Organizer/Chair: Paula Tallal (Rutgers University)
Participants:

Enhancing Language and Literacy Is a Matter of Time
Paula Tallal (Rutgers University)

 

Neuroplasticity-Based “Video Game” Training Improves Students’ Writing Skills
Beth A. Rogowsky (Rutgers University)

 

Modeling Natural Facial Behavior With Computer Vision: Explorations in Learning Contexts
Gwen Littlewort (University of California - San Diego)

 

Demonstration of a Novel Face-Processing and Production Intervention Program for Autism
Jim Tanaka (University of Victoria)

 

The Gamelan Project: A Study of Synchrony and Attention
Alex Khalil (University of California - San Diego)

 

Gamelan Project Demonstration: Online Analysis of Synchrony
Victor Minces (University of California - San Diego)

Discussant Virginia W. Berninger (University of Washington)
Abstract

How does neurodevelopment lead to both gifts and disabilities in the same individual? How do we leverage existing measures to sharpen characterization of twice exceptionality expressed in dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism? Though a topic of compelling interest for those interested in STEM talent and creativity development, because of the strengths often exhibited by twice exceptional individuals such as visual and spatial ability, pattern recognition and memory, and divergent thinking capacity, we know very little about the underlying functional and structural neurophysiology, or translating diagnosis to programmatic avenues for supporting this intellectual combination. This session will report current results from neuroimaging and neuropsychology alongside data from two of the country’s leading centers identifying and serving twice exceptional students.

**Members should attend. Nonmembers and interested parties are also welcome**

2012 BNE-SIG Planned Program

Roundtable Session

Issues in Brain, Neuroscience, and Education
Scheduled Time: Sat, Apr 14 - 10:35am - 12:05pm
Building/Room: Sheraton Wall Centre, Third Level - South Orca
Title Displayed in Event Calendar: Roundtable Session 31
Session Organizer/Chair: Tracey Noel Tokuhama-Espinosa (Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador)
Participants:
  • The Design of Stimulus Tasks To Promote Interdisciplinary Research in Brain-Based Research in Mathematics
    Anthony E. Kelly (George Mason University), John Y. Baek (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), Mary Layne Kalbfleisch (Krasnow Investigations of Developmental Learning and Behavior)
  • Interviews With Academics on Shared Goals, Challenges, and the Future of Neuroscience in Education
    Abigail Lane Larrison (University of California - San Diego)
  • Affective Neuropedagogy: Enhancing the Role of Neuroscience in Emotional Literacy Programs
    Kathryn Elizabeth Patten (Simon Fraser University)
  • Teachers’ Perceptions of Neuroscience, Medical Research, and Students With Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder
    Debby M. Zambo (Arizona State University), Lawrence Paul Sidlik (Arizona State University - West), Ron Zambo (Arizona State University)

Poster Session

Imaging Studies in Educational Neuroscience
Scheduled Time: Sun, Apr 15 - 2:15pm - 3:45pm
Building/Room: Vancouver Convention Centre, First Level - East Ballroom B
Title Displayed in Event Calendar: Poster Session 11
Posters:
  • Examining Relations Between Behavioral and Neurological Indices of Children’s Executive Functioning Skills and Academic Achievement
    Jennie K. Grammer (University of Michigan), William Gehring (University of Michigan), Frederick J. Morrison (University of Michigan)
  • Group Differences in Single-Digit Multiplication Reflected by Event-Related Potentials
    Mark Leikin (University of Haifa), Ilana Waisman (University of Haifa), Shelley Shaul (University of Haifa), Roza Leikin (University of Haifa)
  • An Event-Related Potentials Study on Visual-Spatial Abilities in Identifying 2D Chemical Structures
    Chia-Ju Liu (National Kaohsiung Normal University), Houn-Lin Chiu (National Kaohsiung Normal University), Chin Fei Huang (National Kaohsiung Normal University)
  • Investigating a Strategy for Solving Indefinite Integration Problems in Calculus: An fMRI (Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Study
    Larissa Bucchi Schroeder (University of Hartford), Thomas C. Defranco (University of Connecticut), Kenneth Pugh (Haskins Laboratories)


Paper Session

The Design of Stimulus Tasks To Promote Interdisciplinary Research in Brain-Based Research in Mathematics
Scheduled Time: Sat, Apr 14 - 10:35am - 12:05pm
Building/Room: Sheraton Wall Centre, Third Level - South Orca
Title Displayed in Event Calendar: The Design of Stimulus Tasks To Promote Interdisciplinary Research in Brain-Based Research in Mathematics
Presenters/Authors:
  • Anthony E. Kelly (George Mason University)
  • John Y. Baek (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)
  • Mary Layne Kalbfleisch (Krasnow Investigations of Developmental Learning and Behavior)
 Abstract: Progress at the intersection of cognitive neuroscience and mathematics education is most likely to occur when both disciplines can share data over common stimulus tasks. Ideally, stimulus tasks for use in fMRI, ERP or other methodologies should simultaneously inform theorizing in cognitive neuroscience and in mathematics education. A growing number of published research studies in neuromathematics are now available to begin to describe design principles for the effectiveness of these tasks, and for locating equally powerful tasks in other related literatures. We will report on progress to create stimulus tasks taxonomies, drawing from research in neuromathematics, mathematics education research and neuropsychology.

 

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